Episode 032: The Battle of Golden Hill

February 18, 2018

During the winter of 1769-70, New Yorkers fight with British Regulars.  When New York failed to come up with sufficient money to quarter the soldiers, British Regulars destroy the Liberty Pole.  Isaac Sears, a leader in the local Sons of Liberty Chapter tries to make a citizen's arrest of several soldiers a few days later.  Both sides quickly escalate the event into a massive street brawl involving thousands of soldiers and civilians.  Dozens are wounded.  Both Sears and Alexandar McDougall who gets arrested for a pamphlet opposing a tax to pay for the quartering of Regulars in the city, see their profiles rise as leaders of the colonial resistance.  The Sons of Liberty build a new bigger liberty pole.

For more text, pictures, maps, and sources, please visit my site at AmRevPodcast.Blogspot.com.

 

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Episode 031: Wilkes and Liberty & Tar and Feathers

February 11, 2018

Radical John Wilkes returns from France in 1768 to face the charges for seditious libel.  He would spend the next two years in prison, during which time he would be elected to Parliament, which refused to seat him, as well as other goverment positions.  As much as the King and Parliament hated Wilkes, the people of England loved him as a defender of liberty.  The colonists also took up Wilkes as a hero of the fight for liberty. 

As the sides harden between Parliament and the colonies. Prime Minister Grafton sees no route for a compromise that will resolve the disputes and resigns.  Lord North, a hardliner, becomes the new Prime Minister.

During this same period, different Sons of Liberty organizations are attempting to maintain nonimportation agreeements against London and prevent customs enforcment.  They begin using the practice of tarring and feathering customs informers or low level customs officials in order to prevent effective enforcement of British trade laws.

For more text, pictures, maps, and sources, please visit my site at AmRevPodcast.Blogspot.com

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Episode 030: The Occupation of Boston

February 4, 2018

 

With officials in Boston unable to control the people and enforce the law, Secretary of State Hillsborough decides enough is enough and orders four regiments of British regulars to occupy the town.  Radical colonists debate resisting the troops by force of arms, but decide in the end to back down.  Instead, they simply send protests to London.  Locals harass the soldiers at every opportunity, and make the occupation as difficult as possible.  The Navy attempts to impress (force) local sailors into the fleet, leading to the death of a British officer from those resisting impressment. Gov. Bernard is recalled to London and will never return, leaving Lt. Governor Hutchinson in charge.  Leading radical James Otis suffers an attack that leads to mental instability and his eventual withdrawal from politics.

For more text, pictures, maps, and sources, please visit my site at AmRevPodcast.Blogspot.com.

 

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Episode 029: The Liberty Riot

January 28, 2018

The American Board of Customs arrives in Boston in 1767 ready to enforce the new Townshend duties.  With the backing of the British Navy, the Board tries to show who is boss by seizing a ship belonging to the wealthiest merchant in Boston and a leader of the tax protests, John Hancock.  The seizure of Hancock's ship Liberty results in a riot and the beatings of several customs officials.  The Board learns that they are not the boss and must flee to Castle William, an island in Boston Harbor, to avoid further attacks.  Tough enforcement of customs laws comes to a halt.

For more text, pictures, maps, and sources, please visit my site at AmRevPodcast.Blogspot.com.

 

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Episode 028: Letters from a Pennsylvania Farmer

January 21, 2018

Following passage of the Towshend Acts in 1767, the colonists are unsure how to respond. These are import tariffs, not taxes, which was the line they drew over the earlier Stamp Act. They don't want to pay but have trouble articulating a good argument that everyone accepts.

John Dickinson writes a series of 12 letters, purportedly from "a farmer in Pennsylvania" explaining why these new laws are just as objectionable. His letters push the colonists into real opposition to the new laws. British attempts to shut down the protests by force, only make things worse.

For more text, pictures, maps, and sources, please visit my site at AmRevPodcast.Blogspot.com.

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Episode 027: Prime Minister Pitt Falls from Power

January 14, 2018

Prime Minister William Pitt's illness prevents him from running his administration.  The Duke of Grafton becomes acting Prime Minister for over a year and eventually take the office officially when Pitt resigns in 1768.  Although Grafton is a moderate on colonial issues, he moves hardliners like Lord North and the Earl of Hillsborough into his cabinet.  The Ministry also adds to the Townshend Acts by creating several new Admiralty Courts in America to enforce the Townshend Acts and other customs laws.  With tough enforcement, they hope the colonies will fall in line.

For more text, pictures, maps, and sources, please visit my site at AmRevPodcast.Blogspot.com.

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Episode 026: The Townshend Acts

January 7, 2018

William Pitt, champion of colonial rights, finally becomes Prime Minister in 1766. Illness however, keeps him from active participation in the government. His Lord of the Exchequer Charles Townsend tries to boost revenue by increasing tariffs on a wide variety of colonial imports. While avoiding direct taxes, the new laws are designed to extract money from the colonies as well as increase enforcement actions. Townshend hopes to introduce colonial compliance to Parliament slowly with this first step.

 For more text, pictures, maps, and sources, please visit my site at AmRevPodcast.Blogspot.com.

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Episode 025: Tensions Simmer

December 31, 2017

Following the repeal of the Stamp Act in 1766, colonial protests stopped and trade resumed.  Parliament is not happy about the pushback and seems determined to find a way to put the colonies in their place.  The colonies are unhappy about the Declaratory Act and Parliament's assertion of complete tax authority over the colonies, despite a lack of colonial representation in Parilament.  The colonists and the English people begin to view their interests as in competition with one another.

During this time, many small issues push colonial interests further from those in England.  The death of John Robinson in Virginia reveals a major financial scandal that creates a colonial cash shortage.  Parliament passes the Free Port Act, attempting to give trade advantages to London over the colonies.  A New York assault case Forsey v. Cunningham threatens the right of jury trials.  Bostonians get into a big fight over search warrants.  New Yorkers refuse to pay Quartering Act costs for British regulars in the colony.

 For more text, pictures, maps, and sources, please visit my site at AmRevPodcast.Blogspot.com.

 

 

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Episode 024: Stamp Act Repeal and Declaratory Act

December 24, 2017

The Stamp Act took effect on November 1, 1765.  But colonial opposition prevented the use of any stamps.  Protesters forced newspapers, courts, and ports to operate without stamped paper.  Creditors could not go to court to collect on debts and trading vessels stop going to England.  As a result, English merchants joined in opposition to the Act.

Prime Minister Rockingham replaced Grenville and immediately set about to repeal the law.  The problem was, Parliament did not want to look like it was backing down in the face of mob violence, or sending the message that it accepts colonial assertions that Parliament cannot impose taxes on the colonies.  After months of wrangling and infighting, King George let it be known that he supports the repeal.  Parilament passed the repeal, but on the same day also passes the Declaratory Act which says Parliament still has the authority to pass such laws whenever it wants.  

For more text, pictures, maps, and sources, please visit my site at AmRevPodcast.Blogspot.com.

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Episode 023: The Stamp Act Congress

December 17, 2017

Colonists at all levels of society protested the Stamp Act of 1765.  Newspapers railed against it.  Mobs marched in the streets, and destroyed the  homes of tax agents and other supporters.  Colonial politicians not only spoke out against the Act but organized the Stamp Act Congress to coordinate a unified response to this tax.  At issue was "taxation without representation."  Parliament, for the first time, was imposing a direct tax on the colonists, even though they had no representation in Parliament.  

 

For more text, pictures, maps, and sources, please visit my site at AmRevPodcast.Blogspot.com.

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